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Washington County, Texas
Joint Information Center

Covid-19 Updates - Archive

  • Update - September 11, 2020 - As of September 11th there are 505 recoveries, 40 active cases, and 47 fatalities in Washington County due  to COVID-19. The Joint Information Center (JIC) last reported 490 recoveries, 38 active COVID-19 cases, and  45 fatalities in Washington County on September 4, 2020. View full press release
  • Update - September 4, 2020 - As of September 4ththere are 490recoveries, 38 active cases,and 45fatalitiesin Washington Countydue to COVID-19. The Joint Information Center (JIC)last reported462recoveries, 55activeCOVID-19 cases,and 44fatalitiesin Washington Countyon August 28, 2020. View full press release
  • Update - August 28, 2020 - Case Data Update - As of August, 28th there are 462 recoveries, 55 active cases, and 44 fatalities in Washington County due to COVID-19. The Joint Information Center (JIC) last reported 434 recoveries, 51 active COVID-19 cases, and 41 fatalities in Washington County on August 21, 2020. View full press release
  • Update - August 21, 2020 - Case Data Update - As of August, 21st, there are 434 recoveries, 51 active cases and 41 fatalities in Washington County due to COVID-19. The Joint Information Center (JIC) last reported 395 recoveries in Washington County, 86 active COVID-19 cases and 40 fatalities as of August 13, 2020. The JIC, local public health officials, the County’s Public Health Authority, Dr. William Loesch, and our private healthcare providers remain committed to mitigating the impact of coronavirus in Washington County and to reporting accurate COVID-19 data through the Texas Department of State Health Services (DHSH) webpage. This update also includes an update from Burton and Brenham ISD. View full press release | View video update
  • Update - August 14, 2020 - Case Data Update - As of August 13th, there are 395 recoveries, 86 active cases and 40 fatalities in Washington County. The Joint Information Center (JIC) last reported 365 recoveries in Washington County, 95 active COVID-19 cases and 39 fatalities as of August 7, 2020. The Texas Department of State Health Services (DHSH) webpage incurred a significant data reporting error Sunday, August 9, but the source of that error was identified and corrected. The case data reported by the Texas Department of State Health Services (DHSH) today aligns with the local Health Authority and the Washington County Office of Emergency Management case data. View full press release
  • Update - August 7, 2020 - Case Data Update - Recoveries continue to significantly outpace active cases in Washington County. As of August 7th, there are 365 recoveries, 95 active cases and 39 fatalities. The Joint Information Center (JIC) last reported 302 recoveries in Washington County, 111 active COVID-19 cases and 38 fatalities as of July 30. View full press release
  • Update - July 30, 2020 - Case Data Update - Residents and businesses of Washington County have been patient and cooperative with local officials as they have worked to coordinate the community’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. “I want to thank Washington County, as residents continue to do their part to slow the spread of coronavirus, “said County Judge John Durrenberger. At this time, recoveries in Washington County are outpacing active COVID-19 cases. Currently, there are 302 recoveries in Washington County and 111 active COVID-19 cases. In comparison, the last report stated 295 recoveries and 112 active cases. Currently, there are 38 fatalities which is an increase from the last fatality report of 34. This increase is attributed to a local senior residential living facility. View full press release
  • Update - July 23, 2020 - The County Office of Emergency Management and the Joint Information Center will be making a major pivot in regards to how we report, gather, and most importantly disseminate the information to our county residents. We will no longer be reporting the JIC dashboards of case count, active case count, hospitalizations, recoveries, etc…For several reasons, but primarily due to the Public Health Region 7 Offices’ inability to timely report to us all the numbers. Most importantly to us at this point in the pandemic is RECOVERIES. For this reason, and several others, we will direct the county constituents that go to our site for information to the DSHS State COVID reporting site, which can be accessed by clicking here.

    The JIC and OEM will continue to trend all of our local data, hospitalization rate, population affected rate, burn rate of PPE, and may other important operational information. We believe this is important for verification, tactics, and probably even operations as we move through different phases of the pandemic.

    Each phase of the pandemic will require is to make changes that can better report the most accurate data to you.
  • Update - July 20, 2020 - 5:00 pm - Affected population is 1.22% and 439 total covid cases in Washington County.
  • Update - July 20, 2020 - 5:00 pm - Affected population is 1.11% and 400 total covid cases in Washington County.
  • Update - July 17, 2020 - 9:10 pm - Affected population is 1.09% and 391 total covid cases in Washington County.
  • Update - July 15, 2020 - 8:15 pm - Affected population is 1.04% and 373 total covid cases in Washington County.
  • Update - July 13, 2020 - 10:21 pm - Affected population is 1.02% and 365 total covid cases in Washington County.
  • Update - July 10, 2020 - 10:30 pm - Affected population is 0.98% and 351 total covid cases in Washington County.
  • Update - July 8, 2020 - 7:40 pm - Affected population is 0.93% and 335 total covid cases in Washington County.
  • Update - July 6, 2020 - 7:30 pm - Affected population is 0.89% and 318 total covid cases in Washington County.
  • Update - July 4, 2020 - 11:20 am - Affected population is 0.83% and 296 total covid cases in Washington County.
  • Update - July 1, 2020 - 7:30 pm - Affected population is 0.78% and 280 total covid cases in Washington County.
  • Update - June 28, 2020 - 10:10 am - Affected population is 0.75% and 270 total covid cases in Washington County.
  • Update - June 27, 2020 - 10:30 am - County Judge John Durrenberger and Brenham Mayor Milton Tate are strongly encouraging all citizens in Washington County to wear their masks when out in public. - 6-27-2020 press release
  • Update - June 26, 2020 - 7:20 pm - Case count updated and adding affected population to updates to put active case counts in perspective of population - Affected population is 0.70%. 251 total covid cases in Washington County.
  • Update - June 24, 2020 - 8:30 pm - Case count updated - 245 total covid cases in Washington County
  • Update - June 22, 2020 - 10:30 pm - Case count updated - 242 total covid cases in Washington County
  • Update - June 19, 2020 - 8:30 pm - Case count updated - 226 total covid cases in Washington County - 6-19-2020 press release
  • Update - June 17, 2020 - 5:20 pm - Case count updated - 223 total covid cases in Washington County - 6-17-2020 press release
  • Update - June 15, 2020 - 5:45 pm - Case count updated - 222 total covid cases in Washington County
  • Update - June 12, 2020 - 8:10 pm - Case count updated - 221 total covid cases in Washington County
  • Update - June 10,2020 - 10:20 pm - Case count updated - 218 total covid cases in Washington County
  • Update - June 8, 2020 - 2:20 pm - Case count updated  - 212 total covid cases in Washington County
  • Update - June 3, 2020 - 7:50 pm - Case count updated - 207 total covid cases in Washington County.
  • Update - June 1, 2020 - 7:10 pm - Case count updated - 205 total covid cases in Washington County.
  • Update - May 29, 2020 - 3:30 pm - Case count updated - 203 total covid cases in Washington County.
  • Update - May 27, 2020 - 10:30 pm - Case count updated - 199 total covid cases in Washington County.
  • Update - May 23, 2020 - 1:30 pm - Case count updated - 196 total covid cases in Washington County.
  • Update - May 20, 2020 - 6:30 pm - Case count updated - 191 total COVID cases in Washington County.
  • Update - May 18, 2020 - 9:52 pm - Case count updated - 184 total COVID cases in Washington County.
  • Update - May 15, 2020 - 3:30 pm - Case count updated - 183 total COVID cases in Washington County.
  • Update - May 14, 2020 - 10:45 pm - Case count updated - 179 total COVID cases in Washington County, however, recoveries were updated to 44 recovered.
  • Update - May 12, 2020 - 6:45 pm - Case count updated - 179 total COVID cases in Washington County.
  • Update - May 9, 2020 - 2:55 pm - Case count updated - 168 total COVID cases in Washington County.
  • Update - May 8, 2020 - 6:20 pm - Case count updated - 160 total COVID cases in Washington County.
  • Update - May 7, 2020 - 5:25 pm - Case count updated - 157 total COVID cases in Washington County.
  • Update - May 6, 2020 - 5:05 pm - There are 156 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased. Updates after this will be abbreviated to case total counts once daily.
  • Update - May 6, 2020 - 10:00 am - There are 154 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - May 5, 2020 - 5:30 pm - There are 154 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - May 5, 2020 - 2:00 pm - There are 150 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - May 4, 2020 - 5:10 pm - There are 150 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - May 4, 2020 - 10:00 am - There are 150 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Press Release - May 1, 2020 -Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Planned for Sunday, May 3 
  • Sign Up Begins Saturday, May 2 at 8AM 
  • Washington County is working with state and local partners as well as the Texas Military Department to provide a free, one-day drive-thru test collection site on Sunday, May 3, 2020. Sign up for Washington County now begins on Saturday, May 2 at 8AM, through Sunday, May 3.  
  • To register for test collection:  
    Online: www.txcovidtest.org    
    By Phone: 512-883-2400   
  • Hours: 
    Site Open: 5/3/2020, 8:00 AM  
    Site Close: 5/3/2020, 5:00 PM   
  • Address: 
    1305 East Blue Bell Road, Brenham, TX, USA  
    Washington County   
  • Please note, if you complete the questionnaire today, you will be scheduled for a different county’s testing site. To ensure you sign up for Washington County’s testing site, call or go online tomorrow, beginning at 8AM. 
  • Priority will be individuals with active symptoms, but if you want to be tested, regardless of symptoms, you are encouraged to call the number or go online and complete the questionnaire. Testing is free. 
  • All applicants are not guaranteed to be tested. 
  • Update - May 1, 2020 - 8:00 am - There are 150 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.Update - April 30, 2020 - 3:40 pm - There are 150 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 30, 2020 - 9:30 am - Virtual press conference with county health authority, Dr. William Loesch. View it at this link: https://youtu.be/QDB5CpG0ZBI | English Transcript | Spanish Transcript
    Dr. William Loesch, Washington County’s Local Health Authority, provides an update on COVID-19 cases and the Brenham Nursing and Rehabilitation Center (BNRC) in a video statement to the community.  
    Current numbers for the county include:  
    · 146 positive cases, with 101 from within the BNRC (residents and staff)  
    · 15 deaths, with 13 being from BNRC  
    · 19 reported recoveries  
    All new positive cases are within the BNRC, as stated by Dr. Loesch.  
    The next video update will be released next week and feature Judge Durrenberger, Mayor Tate, and Dr. Loesch.
  • Update - April 30, 2020 - 8:00 am - There are 146 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 29, 2020 - 4:30 pm - There are 146 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • PRESS RELEASE - April 29, 2020 - 4:00 PM
  • Drive-Thru COVID-19 Testing Planned for Texas Counties
  • Washington County set for Sunday, May 3, 2020
    Washington County is working with state and local partners as well as the Texas Military Department to provide a free, one-day drive-thru test collection site on Sunday, May 3, 2020. These mobile testing teams being deployed throughout Texas are designed to focus on rural areas that have not had access to testing or areas where outbreaks require additional testing capacity. Testing is for individuals currently experiencing COVID-19 symptoms. Individuals who want to be tested will be required to complete a call-in or online questionnaire.  

    Please note, the phone number and website to complete the questionnaire will not be available to Washington County officials until Friday, May 1, 48-hours before testing. Once the application is accepted, you will be notified of the time and location of your appointment. Identification is required and must match the name used when completing the questionnaire. Transportation to and from the location is your responsibility and you must remain in your vehicle during the test collection.  

    All applicants are not guaranteed to be tested; however, anyone experiencing symptoms is encouraged to call and complete the questionnaire.

    Residents are encouraged to continue calling the COVID-19 Helpline at 979-337-8420 with questions or concerns.
  • Update - April 29, 2020 - 8:30 am - There are 141 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 28, 2020 - 2:30 pm - There are 141 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 27, 2020 - 3:00 pm - There are 119 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 25, 2020 -9:40 pm - There are 119 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased. 
  • Update - Watch April 25, 2020 Press Conference with Dr. Loesch, Judge Durrenburger, and Mayor Tate at this link:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bApr3iiepOg
  • Update - April 25, 2020 -5:30 pm - There are 113 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 25, 2020 -12:15 pm - There are 112 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 24, 2020 - 7:20 pm - Washington County continues to receive reports that our local residential care facility, Brenham Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, has more positive cases of COVID-19. The Joint Information Center (JIC) Task Force, local public health officials as well as Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS), the facility's regulatory agency, Texas Health and Human Services, continue to be in communication with representatives from the facility to offer support. The county has provided personal protective equipment (PPE) as needed.

    Earlier this week, DSHS advised the facility that all residents and staff be tested for COVID-19. DSHS provided the facility with additional test kits so everyone could be tested. There are currently 67 positive cases within this facility, and more are anticipated in the coming days as results from testing is processed. “Although there is a spike in positive cases due to a single source, the community spread cases are slowing,” said Dr. Loesch, Washington County Local Health Authority.

    As of Friday afternoon, at the request of Senator Kolkhorst and Washington County and City officials, the State of Texas has launched a Mobile Integrated Healthcare Unit to the Brenham Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. Their role will be to triage, test all patients and staff, and assist in facility management. The team will make recommendations for next steps for the facility and patient care.
  • Upate - April 24, 2020 - 4:10 pm - There are 108 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 24, 2020 - 9:40 am - There are 98 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 23, 2020 - 9:05 pm - There are 85 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 23, 2020 - 5:30 pm - There are 78 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 23, 2020 - 10:00 am - There are 76 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 22, 2020 - 5:15 pm - There are 76 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 22, 2020 - 10:15 am - There are 70 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 21, 2020 - 5:50 pm - There are 70 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased. 
  • Update - April 21, 2020 - 1:12 pm - As our COVID-19 positive case count continues to increase in Washington County, the Joint Information Center (JIC) has worked to answer questions and address concerns about the impact of COVID-19 on our community. Washington County officials are engaged in daily communications with Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) to ensure information is shared in a timely and appropriate manner with the public.

    Testing 
    As more cases of COVID-19 are reported around the world, medical advice about who should be tested for the coronavirus is constantly changing to reflect changing levels of risk for infection as well as the limited number of test kits available. Washington County nor the City of Brenham receive test kits. At present, it is noted that test results remain at roughly 70% accurate.

    Can anyone be tested? 
    The answer right now, according to the CDC, is no. Because there is not an unlimited number of test kits available yet, only those that meet certain criteria, like having traveled somewhere with a high number of COVID-19 cases, having exposure to a confirmed case, or currently displaying specific symptoms, are prioritized.

    Are antibody tests available?
    Dozens of companies are working to develop antibody tests, as are researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but Washington County has not received or does not have information on when these tests will be available. Keep in mind, along with so many other unknowns, if you test positive for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, that usually means you've had COVID-19. But you may get a negative result if you've only had the virus a short time. And it's possible to get exposed and not develop antibodies. You may also get a "false positive" which means you have antibodies but had a different kind of coronavirus. 

    What if someone has symptoms and still aren't tested?
    COVID-19 symptoms include fever, cough, and difficulty breathing which are likely to develop between 2 and 14 days after exposure to the virus, according to the CDC. But, unfortunately, those are also symptoms of other common respiratory illnesses. Most hospitals and some urgent care centers can run a test for those and for some types of pneumonia. In most cases, results take a couple of hours. If those results are negative, then doctors might consider ordering a COVID-19 test. But before doing that, they will ask additional questions to determine how likely it is that you were exposed to the virus. 

    Once tested, what happens next?
    For the general public, a doctor's note is typically required to be tested for COVID-19. Once the specimen is processed, the results are sent to the following:  
    • the physician that ordered the test  
    • DSHS  
    • Local health authority 

    For facilities such as retirement, assisted living, or nursing homes, it is common that the facility's Medical Director orders the test for those
    deemed necessary. Once the specimen is processed, the results are sent to the following:  
    • the facility's Medical Director and/or Director  
    • DSHS  
    • Local health authority 

    Case Reporting 
    Washington County officials receive a report from Texas Department of State Health Services listing any new positive cases and with limited information whether the reported case is from the general public or within a facility. The notification of a new positive case may be received several days after the person who tested positive is notified. 

    Local Facility and Positive COVID-19 Cases 
    Currently, Washington County has a residential care facility with multiple positive cases confirmed and six of the seven deaths within our community. Local health officials are in communication with both local and corporate representatives from this facility and have been since April 5, 2020 when the first case was reported. Personal protective equipment (PPE) assistance has been offered by local health officials but the facility's supplies were reported to be sufficient. The JIC Task Force, local public health officials as well as DSHS, the facility's regulatory agency, Texas Health and Human Services, continue to be in communication with representatives from the facility. Many in the community have concerns and questions of why the County and City aren't doing more, releasing more, or assisting more. Judge John Durrenberger states, "Neither Washington County nor the City of Brenham have oversight or jurisdiction in how resident care facilities operate; however, this does not mean it's a time to sit back and do nothing." He continues, "We, as a community, have proven we are all in this together and have demonstrated time and again the impact we can make in others' lives." During this unusual time of so many unknowns, there is much to be done. "Although we may not be able to be as hands-on as we want to be in certain areas, there are many families and individuals to which we can extend our helping hand by: picking up groceries or prescriptions, making and delivering food to those less fortunate, offering a listening ear to the lonely and isolated, and so on," says Mayor Milton Tate. He adds, "The list of possibilities is endless." Washington County and City of Brenham officials want to personally thank the 35,000+ Washington County residents that have diligently obeyed the CDC guidelines to reduce the spread in our community, noting it has made a significant difference. Residents are encouraged to continue calling the COVID-19 Helpline at 979-337-8420 with questions or concerns.
  • Update - April 21, 2020 - 10:00 am - There are 68 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 20, 2020 - 10:19 am - The local COVID-19 Helpline toll free number is currently down. While we work to correct this outage, you can reach the helpline by calling 979-337-8420.
  • Update - April 20, 2020 - 9:30 am - There are 68 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 19, 2020 - 6:30 pm - There are 68 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 18, 2020 - 4:30 pm - Washington County officials received confirmation Saturday that there are twelve new positive cases of COVID-19, bringing the total to 62. Forty-two percent of current cases in our community are from one facility. The Texas Department of State Health Services is in contact and working with the facility. As we continue to follow the prevention measure to reduce the spread, the community is asked to keep these residents, and all those fighting the COVID-19 battle in your thoughts and prayers.

    For questions or concerns regarding COVID-19, please call the toll-free COVID-19 Helpline at 800-845-8035. Updates will continue to be released on the Joint Information Center (JIC) website at bit.ly/covidwctx and on the Washington County Office of Emergency Management Facebook page (@WashingtonCountyOEM).
  • Update - April 17, 2020 - 3:50 pm - There are 50 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased. With much sadness, an additional death is included with this update bringing our deceased total to 4.
  • Update - April 17, 2020 - 8:30 am - There are 49 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased. 
  • Update - April 16, 2020 - 3:30 pm - There are 49 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased. 
  • Update - April 16, 2020 - 7:30 am - There are 44 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 15, 2020 - 9:30 am - There are 44 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 14, 2020 - 7:30 pm - There are 44 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 14, 2020 - 1:00 pm - There are 40 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased. One cased was moved to the recovered phase for a total of 4 recovered.
  • Update - April 14, 2020 - 7:30 am - There are 39 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 13, 2020 - 5:00 pm - There are 39 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 13, 2020 - 8:00 am - There are 37 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 11, 2020 - 2:20 pm - There are 37 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 10, 2020 - 6:10 pm - Washington County officials announced Friday that the second COVID-19 positive patient has died. A female, 90-99 years old with multiple underlying medical conditions passed away Friday afternoon. "It is, again, with a heavy heart that we have to announce that Washington County has lost another of our residents to COVID-19," said Judge John Durrenberger, Washington County Judge.

    The community is asked to keep this family, and all those fighting the COVID-19 battle in your thoughts and prayers and continue following the CDC guidelines to help reduce the spread of COVID-19 during this Easter weekend. If you have questions or concerns regarding COVID-19, please call the toll free COVID-19 Helpline at 800-845-8035.
  • Update - April 10, 2020 - 2:20 pm - There are 36 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 10, 2020 - 10:15 am - There are 31 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 9, 2020 - 4:10 pm - There are 31 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 9, 2020 - 12:45 pm - There are 29 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 9, 2020 - 10:00 am - There are 27 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 8, 2020 - 5:00 pm - There are 27 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 8, 2020 - 12:00 pm - There are 26 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 8, 2020 - 10:00 am - As of April 8, 2020, there are 24 total cases of COVID in Washington County. 3 cases have moved into the recovered phase. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 7, 2020 - 12:45 pm - As of April 7, 2020, there are 24 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased. As of close of business today, Governor Abbott will close all state parks to visitors.
  • Update - April 7, 2020 - 10:10 am - As of April 7, 2020, there are 21 total cases of COVID in Washington County. This number reflects community members that are actively sick, recovered, or deceased.
  • Update - April 6, 2020 - 10:30 am - The JIC, comprised of Washington County emergency management officials, the City of Brenham, local school districts, Blinn, the Chamber of Commerce, Baylor Scott and White, Washington County Sheriff’s office, etc. have announced the introduction of a streamlined resource for Washington County residents to find COVID-19 information, latest news, positive counts and status, and good news stories. “In an effort to simplify the dissemination of information, squash rumors, and ensure the facts are presented, this central resource is essential,” said County Judge John Durrenberger.

    The COVID-19 Communication Plan for Washington County is as follows:

    Updates will be completed by 10AM, Monday - Friday to the JIC website.

    Latest news, good news stories, questions raised by the public, and other pertinent information will be posted to the Washington County Office of Emergency Management Facebook page several times daily and shared by other respective agencies.

    Brenham Mayor Milton Tate says, “We want the public to have as much information and as many facts as possible.” He continues, “If everyone in our community will make this website and the OEM Facebook page their first source of the latest, factual information, we will come a long way in reducing fear, rumors, and miscommunication.” 
  • Update - April 3, 2020 - Washington County officials announced Friday that the first COVID-19 positive patient has died. A male, 80-89 years old with multiple underlying medical conditions passed away early Friday morning. "It's with a heavy heart that we have to announce that Washington County has lost one of our residents to COVID-19," said Judge John Durrenberger, Washington County Judge. He added, “The numbers we report every day are not statistics. These are our fellow community members who are fighting a tough battle." 

    The community is asked to continue following the CDC guidelines to help reduce the spread of COVID-19. If you have questions or concerns regarding COVID-19, call the toll free COVID-19 Helpline at 800-845-8035.

Frequently Asked Questions - Archive


  • Question:  Is it okay for me to donate blood?
  • Answer:  In healthcare settings across the United States, donated blood is a lifesaving, essential part of caring for patients. The need for donated blood is constant, and blood centers are open and in urgent need of donations. CDC encourages people who are well to continue to donate blood if they are able, even if they are practicing social distancing because of COVID-19. CDC is supporting blood centers by providing recommendations that will keep donors and staff safe. Examples of these recommendations include spacing donor chairs 6 feet apart, thoroughly adhering to environmental cleaning practices, and encouraging donors to make donation appointments ahead of time. Source: CDC Guidelines
  • Question: If I have recovered from COVID-19, will I be immune to it?
  • Answer: CDC and partners are investigating to determine if you can get sick with COVID-19 more than once. At this time, we are not sure if you can become re-infected. Until we know more, continue to take steps to protect yourself and others. Source: CDC Guidelines
  • Question:  What is serology testing? And can I be tested using this method?
  • Answer:  Serology testing checks a sample of a person’s blood to look for antibodies to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. These antibodies are produced when someone has been infected, so a positive result from this test indicates that person was previously infected with the virus.  CDC is working with other federal agencies to evaluate the performance of commercially manufactured serology tests that are becoming increasingly available from healthcare providers. This evaluation is expected to be completed in late April.   We do not know yet if the antibodies that result from infection with SARS-CoV-2 can protect someone from reinfection with this virus or how long antibodies to the virus will protect someone. Scientists are conducting research to answer those questions. Serology tests may not be able to tell you if you are currently infected because it typically takes 1 to 2 weeks to develop antibodies to SARS-CoV-2. To tell if you are currently infected, you would need a test that identifies the virus in samples from your upper respiratory system, such as a nasopharyngeal swab. Source: CDC Guidelines
  • Question: Can the COVID-19 virus spread through drinking water?
  • Answer: The virus that causes COVID-19 has not been detected in drinking water. Conventional water treatment methods that use filtration and disinfection, such as those in most municipal drinking water systems, should remove or inactivate the virus that causes COVID-19. Source: CDC Guidelines
  • Question: Why do you need to wear a cloth face covering?
  • Answer: According to the CDC, in light of new data about how COVID-19 spreads, along with evidence of widespread COVID-19 illness in communities across the country, CDC recommends that people wear a cloth face covering to cover their nose and mouth in the community setting. This is to protect people around you if you are infected but do not have symptoms.

    A cloth face covering should be worn whenever people are in a community setting, especially in situations where you may be near people. These settings include grocery stores and pharmacies. These face coverings are not a substitute for social distancing. Cloth face coverings are especially important to wear in public in areas of widespread COVID-19 illness.  
    Source: CDC Guidelines
  • Question: Can I get COVID from my pets or other animals?
  • Answer: At this time, there is no evidence that companion animals, including pets, can spread COVID-19 to people or that they might be a source of infection in the United States. To date, CDC has not received any reports of pets becoming sick with COVID-19 in the United States.

    Pets have other types of coronaviruses that can make them sick, like canine and feline coronaviruses. These other coronaviruses cannot infect people and are not related to the current COVID-19 outbreak. However, since animals can spread other diseases to people, it’s always a good idea to practice healthy habits around pets and other animals, such as washing your hands and maintaining good hygiene. For more information on the many benefits of pet ownership, as well as staying safe and healthy around animals including pets, livestock, and wildlife, visit CDC’s Healthy Pets, Healthy People website.
  • Question: If someone tested positive for COVID19 but no longer has symptoms or is recovered, can he/she still pose a risk to other people?
  • Answer: According to the CDC, the virus that causes COVID-19 is spreading from person-to-person. People are thought to be most contagious when they are symptomatic (the sickest). That is why CDC recommends that these patients be isolated either in the hospital or at home (depending on how sick they are) until they are better and no longer pose a risk of infecting others. More recently the virus has also been detected in asymptomatic persons.

    How long someone is actively sick can vary so the decision on when to release someone from isolation is made using a test-based or non-test-based strategy (i.e. time since illness started and time since recovery) in consultation with state and local public health officials. The decision involves considering the specifics of each situation, including disease severity, illness signs and symptoms, and the results of laboratory testing for that patient. Learn more about CDC’s guidance on when to release someone from isolation and discharge hospitalized patients with COVID-19. For information on when someone who has been sick with COVID-19 is able to stop home isolation see Interim Guidance for Discontinuation of In-Home Isolation for Patients with COVID-19.

    Someone who has been released from isolation is not considered to pose a risk of infection to others.
  • Question:  It is getting warmer, can mosquitos or ticks spread the virus that causes COVID-19?
  • Answer:  At this time, CDC has no data to suggest that this new coronavirus or other similar coronaviruses are spread by mosquitoes or ticks. The main way that COVID-19 spreads is from person to person. See How Coronavirus Spreads for more information.
  • Question:  The Washington County EMS confirmed cases website lists the cause for all patients as “Community Spread.” What is community spread?
  • Answer:  Community spread means people have been infected with the virus from others either locally or if they traveled, from that area. This category of spread also includes some who are not sure how or where they became infected.
  • Question:  Can I get sick with COVID-19 if it is on food? 
  • Answer:  Based on information about this novel coronavirus thus far, it seems unlikely that COVID-19 can be transmitted through food – additional investigation is needed according to the CDC. 
  • Question:  Can the virus that causes COVID-19 be spread through food, including restaurant take out, refrigerated or frozen packaged food? 
  • Answer:  According to the CDC, Coronaviruses are generally thought to be spread from person to person through respiratory droplets. Currently, there is no evidence to support transmission of COVID-19 associated with food. Before preparing or eating food it is important to always wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds for general food safety. Throughout the day use a tissue to cover your coughing or sneezing, and wash your hands after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing, or going to the bathroom.

    It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object, like a packaging container, that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.
      
    In general, because of poor survivability of these coronaviruses on surfaces, there is likely very low risk of spread from food products or packaging.  
  • Question:  It would be good to know which community in the county the cases are from.  Can you give that information?
  • Answer:  We understand your concern, but due to HIPAA we are not able to share that information, however what does happen when a patient is confirmed positive for COVID-19, the Texas Department of Health and their team of epidemiologists work with patients to obtain a list of close contacts who may have been exposed or contracted the virus. They get information on where they’ve been, events they attended, close contacts, etc. If the Texas DSHS (Department of State Health Services) believes you are at risk they contact you directly. If you are not contacted by the Local Health Authority or Texas Department of State Health Services, we believe your risk is low. 
  • Question: Where can local businesses get information for assistance?
  • Answer: There are several resources for local businesses: The Washington County Chamber of Commerce has centralized COVID-19 resources to support business, workforce and the community on its website’s COVID-19 page at https://www.brenhamtexas.com/covid-19/.

    The City of Brenham Economic Development site has business assistance information, resources for employers and employees, and tools to aid the community at https://www.BrenhamED.com/Coronavirus
  • Question: My spouse is running fever and I’m not sure if I need to take them to the doctor? What should I do?
  • Answer: The Center for Disease Control has a Self Check guide to help you make decisions and seek appropriate medical care. The Self Check is available at: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/if-you-are-sick/steps-when-sick.html
  • Question: My spouse works with someone that came in direct contact with a positive confirmed case and is now home with me. Am I contaminated? What should I do?
  • Answer: According to the Center for Disease Control, close contact is defined as, "Close contact is defined as a) being within approximately 6 feet (2 meters) of a COVID-19 case for a prolonged period of time; close contact can occur while caring for, living with, visiting, or sharing a health care waiting area or room with a COVID-19 case - or - b) having direct contact with infectious secretions of a COVID-19 case (e.g., being coughed on)." The CDC says that "close contacts should monitor their health; they should call their healthcare provider right away if they develop symptoms suggestive of COVID-19 (e.g., fever, cough, shortness of breath. 
  • Question: What are essential businesses?
  • Answer: According to the Brenham City Council resolution and the Washington County Declaration continuing the County Judge declaration of Local Disaster adopted April 2, 2020, “Essential services” consist of everything listed by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in its Guidance on the Essential Critical Infrastructure Workforce, Version 2.0, plus religious services conducted in churches, congregations, and houses of worship. Other essential services may be added to this list with the approval of the Texas Division of Emergency Management (TDEM). TDEM maintains an online list of essential services, as specified in Governor Abbott’s Executive Order No. GA-14 and in any approved additions. Requests for additions should be directed to TDEM at EssentialServices@tdem.texas.gov or by visiting www.tdem.texas.gov/essentialservice

    Still unsure? To check to see if your business is classified as essential:
    Go to https://tdem.texas.gov/essentialservices/
    Answer the questions on the page.
    Click Submit. TDEM will email you the determination of your classification according to Order No. GA-14.
  • Question: Why aren't you sharing more information regarding the patients?
  • Answer: Governmental entities are required by federal law to protect the identity of a person, even in the case of a public health emergency. Giving too much information (exact age, neighborhood, schools in which children attend, employer, etc.), leads to a person’s identity being revealed which is a violation of their privacy.

    When a patient is confirmed positive for COVID-19, the Texas Department of Health and their team of epidemiologists work with patients to obtain a list of close contacts who may have been exposed or contracted the virus. They get information on where they’ve been, events they attended, close contacts, etc. If the Texas DSHS (Department of State Health Services) believes you are at risk they contact you directly. If you are not contacted by the Local Health Authority or Texas Department of State Health Services, we believe your risk is low. The best way to protect yourself is to avoid public places. Practice social distancing. Stay home if you are sick. Wash your hands. Avoid touching your face. All these precautions are proven to prevent infection

Latest News & Information - Archive

  • April 25, 2020  - Watch the Virtual press Conference with Dr. Loesch, Judge Durrenburger, and Mayor Tate at this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bApr3iiepOg
  • April 21, 2020 - 4:48 pm - The local COVID-19 Helpline toll free number is back in service. 1-800-845-8035
  • April 20, 2020 - 10:19 am - The local COVID-19 Helpline toll free number is currently down. While we work to correct this outage, you can reach the helpline by calling 979-337-8420.
  • 2020-04-16 - Washington County Businesses:

    Friday, April 17th is the final day for Washington County Businesses to respond to the COVID-19 Business Impact Survey. As we move through this crisis and into recovery, we are trying to assess the best ways to partner with your businesses and get necessary resources into your hands as quickly as possible. Survey results will be tabulated and sent to the Office of Governor Greg Abbott as well as other elected officials. Businesses may retain confidential, if they choose.
  • 2020-04-10 - 5:30 pm
    Washington County officials announced Friday that a second COVID-19 patient has died. A female, 90-99 years old with multiple underlying conditions passed away Friday afternoon. “It is, again, with a heavy heart that we have to announce that Washington County has lost another of our residents to COVID-19,” said Judge John Durrenberger, Washington County Judge.  

    The community is asked to keep this family, and all those fighting the COVID-19 battle in your thoughts and prayers and to continue following the CDC guidelines to help reduce the spread during this Easter weekend. If you have questions or concerns regarding COVID-19, please call the toll-free COVID-19 Helpline at 800-845-8035. 
  • 2020-04-07 - 4:30 pm - What action did the governor take with respect to state parks and historic sites?

    Today (April 7, 2020), Governor Abbott directed the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) and the Texas Historical Commission (THC) to close all state parks and historic sites as part of the state's efforts to strengthen social distancing practices and prevent gatherings of large groups of people. Historic sites and state parks will close to the public starting at 5:00 PM this evening and will reopen at the direction of the Governor.

    "Social distancing is our best tool to curb the spread of COVID-19 and save lives," said Governor Abbott. "The temporary closure of our state parks and historic sites will help us achieve this goal by preventing the gathering of large groups of people. I urge all Texans to continue to stay at home except for essential services as we respond to COVID-19. By following these social distance practices, we will overcome this challenge together."

    Does the governor's state parks closure affect municipal parks?

    No. As of now, each city decides whether to close all or a portion of its parks. That's because his existing shelter in place order provides the following:

    "This executive order does not prohibit people from accessing essential services or engaging in essential daily activities, such as going to the grocery store or gas station, providing or obtaining other essential services, visiting parks, hunting or fishing, or engaging in physical activity like jogging or bicycling, so long as the necessary precautions are maintained to reduce the transmission of COVID-19 and to minimize in-person contact with people who are not in the same household."
  • 2020-04-06 - 10:43 am Information about Levels of Infection Controls - Definitions

    Social distancing — Staying away from large public gatherings or events, avoiding public transportation including buses, taxis and rideshares like Uber and Lyft, and keeping a distance of about six feet from other people. With social distancing, it’s the responsibility of each person to limit how many people they see and in what venues.

    Isolation — Separating or restricting interaction with others, outside of your household, or going out in public because of exposure to the illness.

    Self-quarantine — Choosing to limit interaction with others to protect yourself or family members, particularly if they are more at risk.

    Order of Control Measures – an Order issued by the Local Health Authority or the Department of State Health Services to compel someone who is either infected with or has been exposed to the illness, but refuses to comply with the recommended control measures, such as self-quarantine.

    Quarantine — For those who have tested positive for the illness and must not leave the home or interact with others (except caregivers) in order to limit exposure. This is imposed by an Order of Control Measures or by an Order issued by a court.

    Enforced-quarantine — When an individual has been exposed or potentially ill and has refused to comply with an order of control measures, a court order can be sought in order to compel compliance with a quarantine requirement.

    Stay at Home — An emergency response to protect citizens that mandates people to stay home except for essential travel such as picking up food or groceries, attending essential doctor appointments, picking up prescriptions, etc. Depending on the specifics of the order, you may still be allowed to frequent outdoor spaces, as long as you stay at least 6 feet apart.

    Shelter in Place — An emergency response to seek protection from an environmental hazard by sealing yourself in a safe and secure location instead of fleeing or evacuating.

Do Your Part - Archive

  • May 4, 2020 - Follow Individual Health Protocols: Practice social distancing by putting space between yourself and others. Continue to practice healthy habits to help slow the spread of COVID-19.
    Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds​
    Clean and then disinfect frequently used surfaces​
    Stay home if you’re sick​
    Avoid touching your face​

    Learn more about staying safe and healthy at cdc.gov/covid19
  • May 1, 2020 - Follow Individual Health Protocols:
  • Governor Abbott’s executive order GA-18 established minimum recommended health protocols for all individuals in Texas. Individuals are encouraged to adopt additional protocols consistent with their specific needs and circumstances to help protect the health and safety of all Texans.
     
    Health protocols for individuals:  
    Maintain at least 6 feet separation from other individuals not within the same household. If such distancing is not feasible, other measures such as face covering, hand hygiene, cough etiquette, cleanliness, and sanitation should be rigorously practiced.  
    Self-screen before going into a business for any of the following new or worsening signs or symptoms of possible COVID-19:  
    Cough  
    Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing  
    Chills or Repeated shaking with chills  
    Muscle pain  
    Headache  
    Sore throat  
    Loss of taste or smell  
    Diarrhea  
    Feeling feverish or a measured temperature greater than or equal to 100.0 degrees Fahrenheit  
    Known close contact with a person who is lab confirmed to have COVID-19  
    Wash or disinfect hands upon entering a business and after any interaction with employees, other customers, or items in the business.  
    Consistent with the actions taken by many individuals across the state, consider wearing cloth face coverings (over the nose and mouth) when entering a business, or when within 6 feet of another person who is not a member of the individual’s household.  
  • For more information visits the Governor's Open Texas Report:
    https://gov.texas.gov/uploads/files/organization/opentexas/OpenTexas-Report.pdf 
  • April 30, 2020 - Protect the Vulnerable
    People 65 years or older, especially those with medical issues like heart disease, diabetes, cancer, or a weakened immune system, are at a higher risk for getting very sick or dying from COVID‑19.  
    Every Texan is part of the solution.  
    Act responsibly as we re-engage in the economy, to continue following all health precautions and sanitizing guidelines, and to care for our vulnerable neighbors.  
    Lives depend on our actions. 
    •CDC Guidelines: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html  
    •Prevention Steps: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-gettingsick/index.html  
    •Who Is At High Risk: https://youtu.be/LBHPUegGIpA
  • April 29, 2020 - Critical Health Guidelines
    Stay home if you can. 
    · Wash hands often and for 20 seconds, or use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. 
    · Cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue, then throw the tissue away. 
    · Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands. 
    · Disinfect surfaces, buttons, handles, doorknobs, and other places touched often. 
    · Avoid close contact with people who are sick. 
    · Continue to practice social distancing, avoid crowds, and limit physical contact. 
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) also recommends using simple cloth face coverings in public to help slow the spread of the virus. 
  • Every Texan is part of the solution. You can protect yourself, your family, and your community.
  • From John William Hellerstedt, M.D., Chief Medical Officer Commissioner, Texas Department of State Health Services Follow CDC Guidelines
  • April 28, 2020 - Follow the Minimum Recommended Health Protocols that the Governor of Texas described in his Executive Order April 27, 2020 to Reopen Texas. The protocols can be found at: https://gov.texas.gov/organization/opentexas
  • April 27, 2020 - Stay Home If You Are Sick
    · Stay home except to get medical care. Most people with COVID-19 have mild illness and are able to recover at home without medical care. Do not leave your home, except to get medical care. Do not visit public areas.  
    · Stay in touch with your doctor. Call before you get medical care. Be sure to get care if you have trouble breathing, or have any other emergency warning signs, or if you think it is an emergency.  
    · Call 911 if you have a medical emergency: If you have a medical emergency and need to call 911, notify the operator that you have or think you might have, COVID-19. If possible, put on a cloth face covering that covers your nose and mouth to protect other people. Follow CDC Guidelines
  • April 24, 20202 - Reopen and Keep Texas Open

    I am a Customer. How do I purchase and obtain goods from a retail store that has just re-opened?

    Customers may purchase items from a retail location for pickup, delivery by mail, or delivery to the customer’s doorstep, but may not enter the premises.

    Retail to-go:
    All payments should be done over the phone or internet if possible, and contact should be minimized if remote payment is not available.
    Purchased items should be delivered by the employee to the backseat or trunk of the customer’s vehicle whenever possible to minimize physical contact with the customer.
    Employees must wash or sanitize their hands after each interaction with a customer, and whenever possible, must disinfect any item that came into contact with the customer.

    Retail delivery to customer’s doorstep:
    All payments should be done over the phone or internet if possible, and contact should be minimized if remote payment is not available.
    Purchased items should be delivered by an employee or third-party carrier and delivered to the customer’s doorstep. The employee or third-party carrier may not enter the customer’s house or business.

    Retail delivery by mail:
    All payments must be done over the phone or internet.
    Purchased items should be delivered by mail without customer contact.
    The customer should wash or sanitize their hands after the transaction.
  • April 23, 2020 - Reopen and Keep Texas Open
    I am an Employee of a retail business re-opening. What should I do to keep myself and our customers safe?

    All employees must be trained on environmental cleaning and disinfection, hand hygiene, and respiratory etiquette.

    All employees must be screened before coming into the business for new or worsening cough; shortness of breath; sore throat; loss of taste or smell; feeling feverish or a measured temperature greater than or equal to 100.0 degrees Fahrenheit; or known close contact with a person who is lab-confirmed to have COVID-19. Any employee who meets any of these criteria should be sent home.

    Upon entering the business, employees must wash or sanitize hands.

    All employees must wear face coverings.

    Employees must maintain at least 6 feet separation from one another. dshs.texas.gov/coronavirus
  • April 21, 2020 - Do Your Part to Minimize Tension at Home

    Acknowledge that time alone can be healthy and normal. Rather than perceiving a partner’s wish to be alone as rejection, recognize that we all need solitude. Some people need it more than others.

    Create healthy opportunities to be apart. Going on a walk by yourself or a trip to the grocery store can give partners and family members a welcome break from one another.

    Recognize that you may be overly sensitive to small irritants. Cut each other some slack – work on letting the small stuff slide. Accepting each other’s quirks as just “who they are, god love ‘em” as opposed to criticizing them goes a long way toward dissipating negative emotional energy.

    Look for ways to be constructive. Good relationships rest on the idea that each person takes responsibility for doing their part to promote harmony. Look for ways to be helpful, appreciative and engaged. Others will take notice and may reciprocate.

    Acknowledge the positive actions of others. Rather than focus on what partners and family members do that bug us, look instead at all the wonderful things they do to spread joy and make a stronger team.

    Own up when you mess up. We all fall prey to lapsing into actions that are counterproductive and some of us can be downright mean and nasty. When you catch yourself being critical or negative: stop, take stock, apologize (sincerely) and strive to make amends.

    Use time out to stop the escalation of conflict. Couples therapists recommend that when conflict starts to escalate, either partner can call a time out. Get apart, avoid ruminating about what just happened and ask yourself, “What is my contribution to this conflict, and what can I do to fix it?” Wait at least 30 minutes or longer until the heated emotions have calmed down. Mindfulness, deep breathing and other soothing techniques can help. If there is a need to revisit the issue (often there isn’t), try again to have a constructive level-headed discussion. If escalation resurfaces, call another time out and work harder at what you can do make headway.

    Improve the quality of time together. In addition to looking for healthy ways to be apart, put some energy into making the time together more enjoyable. Fix a special dinner. Do a creative family project. Plant a garden. Watch your favorite movies. When being together, make it count.

    For more information on minimizing tension, go to the University of Houston’s link: https://uh.edu/news-events/stories/2020/april-2020/04142020-minimizing-family-tension-during-covid-crisis.php
  • April 20, 2020 - Do Your Part Avoid Coronavirus Scams

    Don’t respond to texts, emails or calls about checks from the government. The details are still coming together.
    Ignore online offers for vaccinations and home test kits. There are no products proven to treat or prevent COVID-19 at this time.
    Hang up on robocalls. Scammers are using illegal robocalls to pitch everything from low-priced health insurance to work-at-home schemes.
    Watch for emails claiming to be from the CDC or WHO. Use sites like coronavirus.gov and usa.gov/coronavirus to get the latest information. And don’t click on links from sources you don’t know.
    Do your homework when it comes to donations. Never donate in cash, by gift card, or by wiring money.

    For more information https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/coronavirus-scams-what-ftc-doing.
  • April 17, 2020 - Do Your Part Protecting Those At Higher Risk  
    Older adults are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19. If you or those you care for are at higher risk for severe illness, you should:  
    Stay at home if possible  
    Keep away from others who are sick  
    Limit close contact with others  
    Wash your hands often  
    https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/need-extra-precautions/older-adults.html 
  • Be Safe When Getting Gas
    Use gloves or disinfecting wipes on handles or buttons before you touch them.  
    Use gloves or disinfecting wipes on handles and buttons before you touch them (if available).  
    After fueling, use a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds when you get home or somewhere with soap and water. 
  • April 16, 2020 - Do Your Part Managing COVID-19 Related Stress and Anxiety 
    · Everyone reacts differently to stressful situations like COVID-19. You may feel anxious, mad, sad, or overwhelmed. Find ways to reduce your stress to help yourself and the people you care about.
    · Learn the common signs of stress.
    · Make time to unwind and do activities you enjoy.
    · Talk with family and friends by phone, text, or email.
    · If you or a loved one is feeling overwhelmed, get support 24/7 by calling 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746.
    · Learn more about stress and coping during the COVID-19 outbreak: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/managing-stress-anxiety.html. 
  • Slow the Spread of COVID-19
    · Much is unknown about how coronavirus (COVID-19) spreads. We believe it spreads mostly from person to person through respiratory droplets produced when someone who is sick coughs or sneezes.
    · You can help prevent the spread of respiratory illnesses like COVID-19 by following simple daily precautions.
  • April 15, 2020 - Do Your Part Support a Local Business  
    Buy a gift card from a local business.    
    Pay for your next hair cut now and schedule it when it is safe to do so.  
    Order take-out from your favorite restaurant.  
    Leave a social media review for a local business.  
    Shop local on-line stores for gifts.  
  • Safely Accept Deliveries and Takeout Orders
    Limit in-person contact if possible.  
    Pay online or on the phone when you order (if possible).  
    Accept deliveries without in-person contact whenever possible. Ask for deliveries to be left in a safe spot outside your house (such as your front porch or lobby), with no person-to-person interaction. Otherwise, stay at least 6 feet away from the delivery person.  
    Wash your hands or use hand sanitizer after accepting deliveries or collecting mail.  
    After receiving your delivery or bringing home your takeout food, wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.  
    After collecting mail from a post office or home mailbox, wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.  
  • April 14, 2020 - Do Your Part to Support our Community
    Complete the 2020 Census - https://2020census.gov/  
    Ensure our community receives the resources its needs.
  • April 13, 2020 - Slow the Spread at Your Workplace
    Follow CDC workplace guidelines.  
    Minimize nonessential employee travel.  
    Minimize to the greatest extent possible the number of employees working within six feet of one another, including minimizing or canceling large in-person meetings and conferences.  
    Monitor the health and well-being of your employees on a daily basis and take appropriate measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in the workplace.  
    Require employees to stay home when they are sick or have potential COVID-19 exposure, and maximize flexibility in sick leave benefits.  
    Consider use of telecommuting options.  
    Encourage appointment only consultation/meetings.  
    Close business lobbies to the public if possible  
  • Do Your Part to Support our Community
    Complete the 2020 Census - https://2020census.gov/
    Ensure our community receives the resources its needs.  
    Follow CDC Guidelines
  • April 8, 2020 - Know how COVID-19 Spreads:

    Prevent illness and avoid being exposed.

    COVID-19 is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).

    Respiratory droplets are produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks and these droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.

    Some recent studies have suggested that COVID-19 may be spread by people who are not showing symptoms.  
  • Slow the Spread of COVID-19:

    Wash hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

    Cough or sneeze into your elbow or a tissue. Throw the tissue in the trash.

    Stay home if you are sick.

    Avoid touching your face.

    If you have recently returned from a country, state or region with ongoing COVID-19 infections, monitor your health and follow the instructions of public health officials and CDC guidance.
  • April 7, 2020 - Slow the Spread of COVID-19:

    Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.

    If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.

    Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Even if you are young, or otherwise healthy, you are at risk and your activities can increase the risk for others. It is critical that you do your part to slow the spread of the coronavirus.
  • Work or engage in schooling FROM HOME whenever possible 
  • IF YOU WORK IN A CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE INDUSTRY, as defined by the Department of Homeland Security, such as healthcare services and pharmaceutical and food supply, you have a special responsibility to maintain your normal work schedule. You and your employers should follow CDC guidance to protect your health at work. 
  • AVOID SOCIAL GATHERINGS in groups of more than 10 people. 
  • Avoid eating or drinking at bars, restaurants, and food courts – USE DRIVE-THRU, PICKUP, OR DELIVERY OPTIONS. 
  • AVOID DISCRETIONARY TRAVEL, shopping trips, and social visits. 
  • DO NOT VISIT nursing homes or retirement or long-term care facilities unless to provide critical assistance. 
  • PRACTICE GOOD HYGIENE: 
  • Wash your hands, especially after touching any frequently used items or surface. 
  • Avoid touching your face. 
  • Sneeze or cough into a tissue, or the inside of your elbow.

Good News - Archive

  • 2020-04-23 - From the community:
    Brenham ISD served 841 boxes of food to the students in our community. Distribution will continue on Wednesday.
  • 2020-04-20 - From the community:
    Thank you to the community members for the yard signs of support - view signs
  • 2020-04-17 - From Brenham Animal Services:  Thank you Washington County for stepping up to help shelter animals! Our cat room is currently EMPTY!! Don't fear, this doesn't mean we do not have cats for adoption... please check out our Pet Finder page to view cats that are currently in foster! https://www.petfinder.com/search/pets-for-adoption/?shelter_id=TX359
  • 2020-04-16- Funding from the Payroll Protection Program (PPP) which was part of the recent CARES stimulus package is making its way into Washington County. Many local small businesses are working with local community banks to receive this funding to help sustain local jobs. The PPP process is working to support local businesses in Washington County. If you have questions about local assistance for your small business visit https://brenhamed.com/resources/business-assistance. On this site you will find links to connect you to many funding opportunities for small business.
  • 2020-04-14 - Washington County Chamber of Commerce P.E.A.C.E. Partners’ value of the month is HUMILITY. Humility means putting others first by giving up what you think you deserve.
  • P.E.A.C.E. stands for Public Education Ambassadors for Community Engagement. By deciding to become an active member of P.E.A.C.E., Members will be connected to the Canopy Community of the Core Essentials program and Brenham GameChangers to enhance the character of our county’s youth. This partnership will equip Chamber Members with tools and programs to increase the communities’ sphere of influence for our youth and comprehensively develop essential lifelong character traits in them. The Core Essentials curriculum used in Brenham and Burton school districts emphasizes a value word and its life application each month during the school year. The value word centers around three BIG IDEAS: Treat Others Right, Make Smart Decisions and Maximize Your Potential. Brenham GameChangers is the active “on the ground” organization that helps implement the Core Essentials to K-4 th Graders and creates ideas, activities and programs that reach the Middle School, Junior High and High School age students. By being involved with the P.E.A.C.E. program, businesses and organizations will be supporting an effort to help local kids see how to live out these values with friends at school, at home with their families, and in businesses throughout our great community. Businesses and community organizations have the opportunity to be a GameChanger in fostering character-building inside and outside of the schools. 
  • 2020-04-09 - Brenham Fire Department - We want to graciously thank the anonymous donor that provided 15 pizzas to our department, delivered by Dominos today! We are sharing with our extended family, Washington County 911 Dispatchers!
  • 2020-04-08 - Great things are happening in Scenic Estates! Two young girls took their own money and went to Dollar General and bought supplies. They have been putting encouraging notes on mailboxes. We call them our “Mailbox Fairies”. There has even been some sidewalk chalk notes left on driveways.

    We also have a walk, drive, ride your bike with your kid/grandkid Easter egg hunt going on. Everyone was encouraged to color a picture of an Easter Egg and “hide” (display) it in a window of your house.
  • 2020-04-07 - Brenham ISD - COVID Meal Service Began with 217 hot lunches @ Alton on Monday, March 16 and has served 18,693 meals (bkfst & hot lunch) as of 4/2/20 at 3 locations
  • 2020-04-06 - Chappell Hill Bank, in appreciation and gratitude for the presence of the Advanced Community Paramedic in the Chappell Hill community, is providing a meal to the EMS medics each day in the month of April.

    “The Chappell Hill Bank realizes the importance of EMS presence in our community and the vital/essential service that your paramedics offer to area residents. We hope this gesture of positive community spirit from the Bank will help in some small way as we all deal with difficult times and circumstances.”

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